Teson Automotive

1200 Armstrong Street

Algonquin, Illinois 60102

Mon -Fri  7:30am to 5:30pm

Phone: (847) 658-7700

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Spring Car Care Tips

Spring has officially arrived in Algonquin! But that doesn’t mean your vehicle is in the clear – changing seasons means it’s time for maintenance to make sure your vehicle will keep you safely and comfortable on the road through the spring and summer.

April National Car Care Month - visit Teson Automotive for auto maintenance and an inspectionAs we kick off National Car Care Month, here are 8 things you should check on your vehicle to prepare for spring:

1. Antifreeze
Many people think of antifreeze only in cold months. But antifreeze (also known as coolant) also cools the engine in the heat of the spring and summer. This fluid is responsible for keeping your vehicle running at a consistent temperature. Don’t ignore it just because it has “freeze” in its name – antifreeze will become even more important as the weather warms up to prevent overheating engines and vehicle breakdowns.

Stay cool all spring and summer in Algonquin with an auto air conditioning inspection and service2. A/C temperature and check
As the days get warmer in Illinois, we’ve already noticed the need for air conditioning to stay cool and comfortable driving on the roads. But not using this system in the winter months means you’ll likely notice latent problems as the weather gets warm. Stop by our shop and our ASE Certified technicians will perform an inspection, checking the temperature and components in your vehicle’s A/C system. (Be leary of DIY Refrigerant flushes – leave this to the professionals to avoid damaging your vehicle).

3. Tire pressure
Warming temperatures affect tire pressure – a 10 degree increase can drop pressure by 1-2 psi. Low tire pressure means you’ll get fewer miles to each gallon and means your tires will wear faster than if they were properly inflated. Every time you stop at a gas station, check your tire pressure. Many stations even have air available for a top off on-the-go, or stop by our shop and we’ll fill your tires to the right pressure to get you back on the road!

4. Potholes
Road damage, from cracks to potholes to bumps in the road, can wreak havoc on your vehicle in the spring. Even a small pothole can damage your alignment and suspension. If your daily commute involves risks like these, stop by for an inspection early to prevent worsening the damage and premature tire wear.

5. Fluids
Spring is the perfect time to take care of routine maintenance before warm weather puts a toll on your vehicle. From your oil to coolant, transmission fluid, and brake fluid, winter can be harder on your vehicle. Small problems may become more noticeable as we head into the spring season. Have your fluids checked and replace as needed. When you bring your vehicle in for an inspection, our ASE certified technicians will check all of your fluids and recommend maintenance as needed – we’ll even top off your windshield washer fluid to keep you safe through spring showers!

6. Wash exterior
Winter roads can leave your vehicle covered in dirt and salt. Not only is this unsightly, it can actually harm your exterior. A thorough wash can remove chloride, salt, and chemicals from the exterior of your car. Be sure you clean the underside too! This is where the most dirt and chemicals can collect and post the biggest threat. As an extra bonus, take pride in your vehicle again when it is clean and looks like new!

penny7. Tire tread
Take a look at the tread on your tires using the penny test, looking carefully for any uneven patches or bald spots. While it might not seem as important in the spring, this time of year is the rainiest and wettest season. Good traction is important for driving on wet roads, especially unexpected or panic stops. If you’re not sure how to check your tires, stop by our shop and our technicians will help!

8. Spring Inspection
The best thing you can do for your vehicle this spring is stop by for a full inspection. When you bring your vehicle into our shop, our auto technicians can check all of the issues above, and can fix any problems we find right away. Most issues, including alignment, coolant, and fluid flushes, can be performed right away to get your vehicle back on the road quickly and safely.

Don’t be fooled thinking that just because it’s spring your car is now in the clear – changing seasons mean changing conditions for your vehicle. Check the elements above in your vehicle, or stop by our shop for a full inspection. Wishing you a fun and safe National Car Care Month!

If you have any questions about the care of your vehicle, preparing for spring in Algonquin, or scheduling an appointment, call our advisors at (847) 658-7700.

3 Cat Litter Auto Myths – True or False?

Kitty litter often makes an appearance in lists for auto emergency kits or winter safety tips – but why is this strange “tool” so popular? What is it for? Does it really work?

Here, we address three “myths” about cat litter to help you stay safe on slick winter roads in Algonquin, IL. Before you find yourself stuck (without cat litter), make sure your car can handle winter conditions – call our team at 847-658-7700.

 Cat Litter_Car EmergencyMyth #1 – Cat litter provides Traction

TRUE! If your vehicle gets stuck in a snow bank or on a slick road, cat litter can help create the traction you need to get out. Pour a little around your tires to give them something to grip as you navigate onto the road. The non-clumping kind works best for extra traction on slick roads.

Myth #2 – Cat Litter Weighs Down your Car

TRUE! As cat owners know, bags of cat litter are heavy. When you’re not stuck in the snow, the weight of cat litter in your trunk can also help improve traction by adding weight to the back end of your vehicle. Especially in trucks and cars that are front heavy, a little extra weight in the rear of your vehicle can help stabilize you, keeping you in control of your vehicle on slick roads.

Cat litter provides traction on slick winter roadsMyth #3 – Cat litter is an alternative to “Ice Melt”

FALSE! Cat litter does NOT act as an “ice melt” for your driveway. While it will provide traction for vehicles and pedestrians on ice, it will not speed up melting of the ice (the way salt ice melt does – salt lowers the freezing point of water to help it melt faster). In fact, as the ice starts to melt, the kitty litter may absorb the moisture, leaving you with slippery, wet clay to sweep away.

Drive safely on the winter roads across Algonquin this season. Don’t forget to pick up some cat litter for your winter auto emergency kit – store a bag in your trunk for weigh and traction on slick roads. To make sure your vehicle is prepared for winter road conditions, schedule an appointment or call 847-658-7700.

Stay Safe this Winter – 10 Things you need in your Emergency Kit

Winter is here in Algonquin, IL. Unseasonably cold weather has hit even places like the Deep South. With the polar vortex as a regular occurrence in our winters, below zero temperatures, and snow in places that don’t normally see snow, you need to be prepared for winter hazards.

When snow and ice cover the roads, the risk of emergencies increases. We hope you’ve already taken advantage of our winter inspection to make sure your vehicle can handle the winter road conditions. To stay safe and prepare for winter emergencies, gather these 10 things in your vehicle for a winter emergency kit:

  1. Windshield scraper – On cold winter mornings, you’ve probably had to pry a thick layer of ice from your windshield. Keep a scraper (or one of these hacks!) in your car this season so you won’t be stuck waiting for the defroster to melt through the ice.
  2. Tire chains – If you’re often driving on icy and snowy roads, tire chains help provide traction for safe driving. Choose the right type for your vehicle, and learn how to put them on your tires BEFORE you need them in an emergency.
  3. Blanket and winter hat – Keep these things (add scarves, gloves, sweaters, etc.) in your vehicle to stay warm. You may not want to keep your vehicle running if you’ll be stuck for a long time, or dead batteries and an empty gas tank can prevent you from running the heater.
  4. Small shovel – This can be vital when you find yourself stuck in a snow bank. You can even purchase a smaller, folding shovel for easier storing in your vehicle.
  5. Cat litter – If you’re stuck on snow or ice, sprinkling some cat litter over the road can help provide traction to get your car moving again.
  6. Cardboard box – Like cat litter, a cardboard box can provide a boost of traction to get you moving on a slick road. Simply place the cardboard under a tire, get out of the way, drive over it, and you’re on your way.
  7. Gloves and hand warmers – Gloves can make a huge difference while your performing emergency repairs in the cold (like changing a flat tire or jump-starting your vehicle). They keep you warm, and prevent grease and oil from getting on your hands. You can also keep a few chemical hand warmer packs in your kit for extra heat.
  8. Hazard lights or reflectors – In these cold months, the dark hours outlast the light. Visibility is critical for keeping you safe in an emergency. Pick up a few inexpensive reflective hazard triangles to put on the road to warn other drivers of your presence. It’s also a good idea to keep a flashlight to help you see, perform tasks, and stay safe at night.
  9. Water and Nonperishable food – Being stuck in the cold is bad enough, don’t add hunger and thirst to the mix. A supply of snacks and water will keep you hydrated and satisfied until help arrives. The calories can also help keep you warm!
  10. Tow strap – If you find yourself so stuck that shovels, cardboard, and cat litter can’t help, you may need a tow. Keep a tow strap in your kit so a kind driver can help you get back on the road.

Gather these things and keep them in your vehicle this season so you can stay safe on the roads all winter long. Keep the phone number for roadside assistance and our shop in your glove box – (847) 658-7700 – give us a call anytime, we are here for you! Stay warm and safe this winter!

Preparing for Fall and Winter Road Conditions

fall-car-care-winter-road-prepIs your car ready for the changing weather? As summer comes to an end, we know that means cooling temperatures, rain, and falling leaves in Algonquin, IL. It also means winter will be here before we know it!

As National Fall Car Care Month, this month is the perfect time to ask, “Is my car ready for autumn and winter?” Here are eight things you should check to make sure your car can handle the coming weather and road conditions:

  1. Tire pressure – Cooling temperatures can affect the pressure in your tires, as external pressure changes with the weather. Take a few moments to check your tires with a pressure gauge and make sure it’s filled to the recommended level. Proper tire pressure not only reduces the chance of a flat, but also improves fuel efficiency.
  2. Tire treadCheck your tire tread too! While 2/32” is the minimum acceptable tread on your tire, rain and snow conditions require more tread for safe driving. Your tires should have at least 4/32” of tread, without bulges, wear, or bald spots, so you don’t risk losing control of your car on slick roads.
  3. Windshield wipers – If you wait for the next rain storm to check your windshield wipers, you’re risking your safety. Get in the habit of running your washer fluid periodically – you’ll be able to monitor if your wipers need replaced, and you’ll have a cleaner windshield!
  4. Defroster/Heater – Also test your defroster before the cold weather hits. On the next cold morning, turn on your heater to make sure it’s working. Make sure air flow reaches your windshield and isn’t blocked in any spots. If it takes too long to warm the interior, bring your car in for a heating system inspection.
  5. Battery condition – As temperatures drop, your battery may begin to show signs of failure. Test your battery’s condition using a multimeter (or have it tested) to ensure it is operating in the acceptable range. If your battery is getting old or can’t hold the proper charge, your vehicle may not be able to start on cold mornings.
  6. Brakes – When roads are slick with rain and snow, your brakes are put to the test! Brakes are subject to wear and tear with normal use of a vehicle, which means you’ll need to have them serviced and replaced periodically. Have them inspected before the first storm so you know that they are up to the task.
  7. Cooling system – If you’ve been putting off your coolant flush, have it done before winter arrives. Coolant (aka antifreeze) is critical to keep your engine running at the proper temperature even when the weather gets cold.
  8. Winter tools – Chances are you took that pesky ice scraper out of your car to make room for summer gear. Now is the time to put it back in your trunk or glove box so you are prepared for early frosts of the year. It’s also a great time to start prepping your auto survival kit.

Pay attention to your vehicle as the weather changes – some systems that work fine during the summer may start to reveal warning signs this season. Make sure your vehicle is up-to-date on manufacturer recommended maintenance, and address any concerns before they lead to bigger problems and costly repairs.

Stop by our shop for an inspection to make sure your car is ready for this fall!

Cooling System Flush – is it really necessary?



Overheating is the most common cause of vehicle breakdowns and internal engine damage. As the heat rises in the summer, our shop sees more and more people coming in after breakdowns due to cooling system failure. But there is an easy answer!

A cooling system flush can keep your engine running smooth and cool even on the hottest days. Regularly changing your coolant, aka antifreeze, can prevent larger problems for your cooling system and engine and keep your family safe on the road!

What is the Cooling System?

Cooling-System

The cooling system is responsible for keeping your vehicle’s engine from overheating. The engine runs best at a high temperature, so the cooling system helps it to heat up quickly then keep the engine at a regular, constant temperature without overheating as it runs. It accomplishes this by transferring heat into the air with the help of coolant, or antifreeze, and the other components of the cooling system.

In most cars, the cooling system works by circulating radiator fluid (the mixture of coolant and water) through parts and pipes in the engine to absorb the heat and cool the engine. A radiator at the end of the system captures and transfers the heat from the fluid into the air.

But my coolant still looks clear, why should I change it?

New coolant usually appears a bright green or a bright red color, as in the picture below.

coolant-fluid-green

As the coolant runs through the engine, rust and contaminants caused by oxidation and corrosion mix in with the fluid. Unfortunately, when you look under the hood to check your fluid, it may still appear clean and clear even though these contaminants rest under the surface, unseen and threatening the life of your engine.

This video from Monday Morning Mechanic shows the striking visual of these hidden contaminants, and the threats they pose: http://mondaymorningmechanic.com/helpful-money-saving-videos/?mmmvideo=38#video

How often should I flush my coolant?

Most manufacturers recommend that you change the radiator fluid (the mixture of antifreeze coolant and water) every 24,000 to 36,000 miles or 24 to 36 months. Depending on your driving habits, you may need to flush your coolant more often – we recommend every 1-2 years.

Be leery of “extended life” coolants that tout 100,000 mile lifespans – even these can accumulate rust and contaminants that threaten your engine life. These impurities could add up and cause bigger problems before you reach the 100,000 mile check.  Even with “extended life” fluids, you should have these coolants checked frequently.

What happens if I don’t?

Failing to change your coolant can take as much as 100,000 miles off the life of your engine, in addition to big problems and expensive repairs.

Coolant flows through your entire engine, leaving behind contaminants. They can collect on the radiator, inside the water pump or thermostat, getting stuck and preventing the components from working appropriately. Plastic components, like the water pump, can wear and break apart. If the water pump breaks, the system won’t be able to move the water and coolant through the engine. Hoses can also react to contaminants, becoming swollen and rusty on the inside even as they appear normal on the outside. With excess heat, belts that control the cooling system and steering will start cracking, eventually breaking and disabling the systems (imagine a steering belt break, not being able to control your vehicle!).

Bottom line – contaminated coolant can lead to cooling system failure, causing your engine to overheat and break down, leaving you stranded on the road!

We assume your family’s safety is at the top of your priority list, so having your coolant flushed or even just checked while it’s still scorching outside, and before it gets cold, should be as well. Avoid expensive engine breakdowns by having your coolant flushed before problems arise. Call us at 847-658-7700 or stop by our shop.

Oil Change Basics – Different types of Motor Oil

Changing your vehicle’s oil is one of the most basic aspects of maintenance – every vehicle needs it regularly to continue to function properly. If you are setting up an appointment with your mechanic, chances are it’s to have your oil changed. But how much thought do you usually put into this process? Or, like many of our customers, do you simply follow the 3 months/3,000  mile rule and let our techs handle the rest?

Our technicians are here for just that – we keep track of the details, know the manufacturer recommendations, and identify the right type of motor oil for your vehicle so you don’t have to. But if you have ever wondered what makes different types of oil unique, or why you should use one type over another in your vehicle, read on!

This guide from How Stuff Works discusses 5 types of oils and how manufacturers specify oil type for your vehicle:

“Often times a manufacturer will suggest two or more motor oil viscosities for an engine, such as a 5W-20 or 5W-30, based on several different factors — including temperature. The reason for this is that engines often need a different viscosity based on operating conditions. Knowing how scientists see viscosity will help an owner determine the best oil for the engine.

Viscosity, at its most basic, is a fluid’s resistance to flow. Within the engine oil world, viscosity is notated with the common “XW-XX.” The number preceding the “W” rates the oil’s flow at 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-17.8 degrees Celsius). The “W” stands for winter, not weight as many people think. The lower the number here, the less it thickens in the cold. So 5W-30 viscosity engine oil thickens less in the cold than a 10W-30, but more than a 0W-30. An engine in a colder climate, where motor oil tends to thicken because of lower temperatures, would benefit from 0W or 5W viscosity. A car in Death Valley would need a higher number to keep the oil from thinning out too much.

The second number after the “W” indicates the oil’s viscosity measured at 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius). This number represents the oil’s resistance to thinning at high temperatures. For example, 10W-30 oil will thin out at higher temperatures faster than 10W-40 will.

The owner’s manual will advise the best viscosity range and the owner can then work within those parameters.

With the right viscosity in mind, it’s time to start shopping for a type of oil. Most commuters follow the 3-month and 3,000-mile (4,828-kilometer) rule. Frequent oil changes means there’s less tendency to need other types of oil than conventional. However some car companies, like Mercedes-Benz and BMW, recommend only synthetic oil in their cars. The following list, as well as the car’s owner’s manual, will provide a good idea of what type of oil to use. It’s also a good rule of thumb not to switch between types. If your car started with conventional, stick with that. If it first used synthetic, be wary about switching to conventional.

  • Conventional Oil: This is the oil used in bulk at dealerships and is the cheapest at the auto store, too. Most adhere to API and SAE standards but offer little in the way of additive packages. This is good oil for owners that are religious about frequent oil changes and have low-mile (but well broken-in) engines.
  • Premium Conventional Oil: This is the standard new-car oil. Most leading brands have one for SL, or highest level, service. Most are available in the common viscosities. Car manufacturers usually specify 5W-20 or 5W-30 oil, though some require 10W-30. These three ratings cover just about every light-duty vehicle on the road, though this is changing as engines become more precise and fussy about specific types oil.
  • Full-synthetic Oil: These oils are made for high-tech engines. If these oils pass stringent special tests (indicated by their labeling), it means they have superior, longer-lasting performance in all the critical areas, from viscosity index to protection against engine deposits. They flow better at low temperatures and maintain peak lubrication at high temperatures. While excellent oil, synthetics are about three times as expensive as conventional oil and not always necessary for most engines. Use the owner’s manual as a guide. If it doesn’t call for synthetic oil, using it will only be an additional expense that may not add anything to the engine’s performance or life.
  • Synthetic-blend Oil: This is essentially premium conventional oil hit with a dose of synthetic. They’re formulated to offer better protection during heavier engine loads and the associated higher engine temperatures. These oils are popular with pick-up and SUV drivers because they do offer better protection, but usually cost only a fraction more than premium conventional oils.
  • High-mileage Oil: More than 60 percent of vehicles on the road have more than 75,000 miles (120,701 kilometers) on the odometer. Playing to this growing market, oil refiners and labs developed high-mileage oils. Seal conditioners are added to the oil (the oil can be synthetic or conventional) to expand and increase the flexibility of internal engine seals. The conditioners are very precise and can benefit some engines while not affecting others.”

To read more about types of motor oil, read the full article from How Stuff Works. To discuss the motor oil options for your vehicle, call our experts at 847-658-7700! Stop by our shop anytime, or schedule your next oil change with us today!

How Hybrids Work and What Makes Them Different From Regular Cars

Have you ever wondered how a hybrid vehicle actually works? Whether the increasing price of gasoline has you considering the economic benefits or global warming has you rethinking the environmental costs of driving, a hybrid car is an appealing alternative. But what makes a hybrid different from a regular car?

Hybrid vehicles work by combining two (or more) power sources. A moped is actually a hybrid, combining the gasoline engine with the rider’s pedal power. Most hybrid cars use gasoline and electric – combining a traditional combustion engine with an electric motor. This gives you the best of both worlds – you can still have the power and convenience of a gasoline-powered engine with the economic benefits of an electric engine.

Though all it takes to be a “hybrid” is two power sources, hybrid vehicles also have a few unique features that allow them to work more efficiently. The first feature is Idle off, which turns the gasoline engine off when the car is stopped – which means fuel savings! The electric engine continues to power the vehicle while stopped, and the gasoline engine turns back on when you are ready to drive again.

Regenerative braking is another feature of hybrid vehicles. A typical car relies on the mechanical brakes to slow and stop, creating friction that reduces the vehicle’s kinetic energy. A hybrid can use its electric motor for “regenerative braking.” The electric motor captures the kinetic energy from the moving car and converts it into electricity. Instead of losing the heat energy from the brakes, your car can save and store some of the energy in the battery to be used later!

Hybrids also utilize power assist and engine downsizing to operate the vehicle. To qualify as a hybrid, the electric motor must be large enough to actually supplement the engine to power the car and accelerate while driving. Some hybrids rely on engine downsizing, using physically smaller engines or those with more effective combustion cycles. Power assist then reduces the amount of engine work and gasoline needed to accelerate and run the vehicle. Through these methods, hybrid cars achieve the same power as traditional vehicles but use less gas!

The features above are true of all hybrid vehicles, but hybrid cars can vary from the basic, minimum features to fully hybrid – offering electric only drive capability and extended battery electric range. Other variations include how the components are arranged in the drivetrain, working either in series or parallel (or sometimes both).  The batteries, electric motor, gasoline engine, and other components work together in the drivetrain to operate the vehicle, allowing you to slow, accelerate, cruise, and brake.

Hybrid vehicles combine a traditional combustion engine with an electric motor and battery to operate your vehicle, take advantage of the benefits of both systems, and save you money on fuel! If you have more questions about hybrid vehicles, stop by the shop or call (847) 658-7700 for more information.

Organization tips to keep your car fresh and comfortable!

Does the inside of your car look like this?messy car interior

We know that life can be a little crazy, and it’s easy for your car to be clean one week and look like you’re living in it the next. Not only can a messy car be stressful and embarrassing, but the distractions of a messy car can be a safety hazard! These organization tips will help you keep your car clean and organized so your daily commute can be relaxing and safe:

Assign a home for all the necessary items that stay in your car such as sunglasses, umbrellas, shopping bags, cleaning supplies, etc. If all of the things that live in your car have a dedicated place, it is easier to find them when you need them and put them away when you are done! Consider following the “two-weeks rule” for all the items that end up staying in your car – if you haven’t used the item in 14 days and it isn’t part of your emergency kit, it probably doesn’t need to stay in your car.

Don’t stash your trash in the nooks and crannies of your car. Instead, collect trash in a plastic grocery bag or a small trashcan. When it is full, empty the trash right away. Every time you stop at a gas station to fill up, take a moment to throw out any lingering trash. You can even keep a supply of bags in the pocket behind your seat for easy clean up and collecting on the go. There is no good reason to keep trash in your car, so get rid of it. Plus, you’ll increase MPG by removing excess weight from your car!

Containers are a great way to collect and organize all of the items in your car. Consider using a cardboard box, collapsible tote, or plastic tub to contain items kept in your trunk. If you keep a lot of small items in your trunk, try using a multiple compartment, collapsible bin. (Picture below) You can even attach Velcro to the bottom to prevent it from sliding around. A coupon or recipe organizer is an easy way to keep track of important papers in your car’s glove box. Cup holder organizers come in a variety of styles to fit your needs, including compartments for your cell phone, sunglasses, or loose change.car organization

Keep it fresh and clean with a periodic thorough cleaning. This can be as simple as wiping down the dashboard and vacuuming the seats and floor mats, or you may consider a deep cleaning and detailing. Cleaning your car also gives you the opportunity to retrieve small items that may have fallen under the seats – that space between the seat and the center console can seem like a black hole for coins and stray French fries! Taking the time to clean your car’s interior can keep your car in good condition and protect your investment. A clean interior can also help you stay motivated to keep your car organized! One easy trick for keeping your car smelling clean: keep a fabric softener sheet under the seats for a fresh scent!

A messy car might seem like an unavoidable fact of life, but it is easy to tame the mess with a few organization tips! Try some of these suggestions, or find your own system that works best for your car. Without the distractions of a messy car, you can be a safer, more relaxed driver!

Winter Car Tips: Ice Scraper Life Hacks

Have you ever found yourself in an icy situation without an ice scraper handy?

This month, our team of ASE-Certified technicians is taking a break from auto repair tips to bring you some ice scraper life hacks.

The winter months in Algonquin can be a torture, and having an ice scraper is a must-have accessory for your vehicle. Snowfall and freezing temperatures bombard your windshield, diminishing your visibility with ice but, after a few scrapes, you’re ready for the road.

We have all had moments where we realize that we forgot something once it’s too late. Whether yours broke, you forgot to buy one, or you lent it to a friend, facing an ice covered windshield without a scraper is enough reason to get back in bed and call it a day.

If you find your car covered in snow or ice and you don’t have an ice scraper readily available, try these tricks to clear your windshield and mirrors:

Plastic card- Often times, a thin layer of ice can easily be removed with a plastic card from your wallet or purse.  Hold onto a used gift card, and you’ll have an ice scraper on you at all times. Don’t use valuable credit cards or IDs though since the ice may cause damage to the card. 

Card Ice Scraper Life Hacks

Spatula- If you have any extra spatulas in your kitchen, you already have have a backup ice scraper. A stiff plastic one should do the trick.

spatula Ice Scraper Life Hacks  CDs-Do you still listen to that summer mix you made 15 years ago? If so, put the music on your computer and use the CD to clear your windshield! This method works best for a thick layer of ice.

 CD Ice Scraper Life Hacks

 Get creative! – Desperate times call for desperate measures. From hard plastic cups to hangers, or pretty much anything with a thin plastic edge, it’s easy to find a makeshift ice scraper.

The moral of the story is to be prepared this winter. Having the needed winter accessories for your vehicle will help keep you on schedule, avoid unnecessary auto repairs, and keep you and your family safely on the road when the frost and ice try to slow you down. A quick stop to our shop for a winter inspection will also help you avoid any untimely breakdowns that the harsh winter weather may cause.

For any other automotive questions, be sure to call us at 847-658-7700 so our ASE-Certified technicians can help you stay prepared and safe on the road this winter!

The 5 Thanksgiving Travel Tips Every Driver Needs to Know

HOLIDAY TRAFFIC

According to a 2012 AAA report, the number of Thanksgiving travelers has been steadily increasing since 2008. In fact, there were 43.6 million Americans traveling 50 miles or more during the Thanksgiving weekend, and 90% of those travelers (39.2 million) were making the trek by car.

You can count on the roads throughout Algonquin to be crowded this holiday season, so our team has some key tips to help you reach your destination safely!

1. Check your tire pressure: Tire pressure can easily be forgotten. If they aren’t properly inflated, you can decrease your gas mileage up to 0.6 MPG. Also, if you come across any inclement weather during your holiday travel, over or under inflated tires can cause a loss of traction and lead to an accident. Tires should be checked before your holiday journey to keep you safe.

2. Spark Plugs: When is the last time you checked or changed your spark plugs? A dirty, corroded or improperly installed spark plug can leave you stranded on the side of the road during your holiday travel. It will also decrease your MPG by a whole 2 MPG.

3. Don’t wait for an empty gas tank to fill up: Once your gas tank drops below half-full, it becomes easier for the remaining gas to evaporate. As you travel to your Thanksgiving destination, fill up when you’re down to half a tank. You’ll be able to take more breaks and rest to keep you energized during your trip and you’ll save some money at the gas pump.

4. Your headlights could just be dirty, not dim: You don’t need to spend hundreds of dollars for brighter headlights during your Thanksgiving commute. Chances are they just need to be cleaned, not replaced. Our shop will polish and clean your headlights for a fraction of what replacement lights would cost.

5. Buckle up: Safety belts reduce the risk of fatal injury by 45 percent and are a simple way to increase your safety on the road. There is plenty of law enforcement patrolling the roads over the holidays. Don’t fall victim to a ticket you can easily avoid.

If you’re looking to hit the road for the holidays stop by our shop; we’ll provide you with the best customer service and auto repair in Algonquin. If you have any questions or concerns, call us at (847) 658-7700 and let us inspect your vehicle and prevent any untimely breakdowns. Our team at Teson Automotive will always be here to help your holiday travel plans.